1823, Spain, Ferdinand Vii. Silver Restoration Of Absolutism Medal. Pcgs Unc+

1823, Spain, Ferdinand VII. Silver Restoration of Absolutism Medal. PCGS UNC+
1823, Spain, Ferdinand VII. Silver Restoration of Absolutism Medal. PCGS UNC+
1823, Spain, Ferdinand VII. Silver Restoration of Absolutism Medal. PCGS UNC+

1823, Spain, Ferdinand VII. Silver Restoration of Absolutism Medal. PCGS UNC+




1823, Spain, Ferdinand VII. Silver Restoration of Absolutism Medal. PCGS UNC+   

1823, Spain, Ferdinand VII. Silver Restoration of Absolutism Medal. PCGS UNC+

Silver "Restoration of Absolutism" Medal. Mint Year: 1823 Mint Place: Segovia Reference: V-342. Certified and graded by PCGS as UNC Details: Filed Rims!

Denomination: Medal - Intervention of the Quadruple Alliance (Austria, France, Prussia and Russia) and the Restoration of Absolutism in Spain. Diameter: 40mm Weight: 29.6gm Material: Silver. Obverse: Military uniformed bust of Ferdinand VII of Spain right. Reverse: Double-headed eagle, topped by Spanish crown above four crowns (Austria/Prussia/Russia/France) of the Quadruple Alliance in cross-like shape on wreath of olive- and laurel- branches.

King Ferdinand VII provoked widespread unrest, particularly in the army, by refusing to accept the liberal Spanish Constitution of 1812. In January 1820, soldiers assembled at Cadiz for an expedition to South America, angry over infrequent pay, bad food and poor quarters, mutinied under the leadership of Colonel Rafael del Riego y Nuñez. Pledging fealty to the 1812 Constitution, they seized their commander. Subsequently, the rebel forces moved to nearby San Fernando, where they began preparations to march on the capital, Madrid. Despite the rebels' relative weakness, Ferdinand accepted the constitution on March 9, 1820, granting power to liberal ministers and ushering in the so-called Liberal Triennium (el Trienio Liberal), a period of popular rule.

However, political conspiracies of both right and left proliferated in Spain, as was the case across much of the rest of Europe. Liberal revolutionaries stormed the King's palace and seized Ferdinand VII, who was a prisoner of the Cortes in all but name for the next three years and retired to Aranjuez. In 1822, Ferdinand VII applied the terms of the Congress of Vienna, lobbied for the assistance of the other absolute monarchs of Europe, in the process joining the Holy Alliance formed by Russia, Prussia, Austria and France to restore absolutism. In France, the ultra-royalists pressured Louis XVIII to intervene. To temper their counter-revolutionary ardour, the Duc de Richelieu deployed troops along the Pyrenees Mountains along the France-Spain border, charging them with halting the spread of Spanish liberalism and the "yellow fever" from encroaching into France.

In September 1822, the cordon sanitaire became an observation corps and then very quickly transformed itself into a military expedition. The Holy Alliance (Russia, Austria and Prussia) refused Ferdinand's request for help, but the Quintuple Alliance (United Kingdom, France, Russia, Prussia and Austria), at the Congress of Verona in October 1822, gave France a mandate to intervene and restore the Spanish monarchy. On 22 January 1823, a secret treaty was signed at the congress of Verona, allowing France to invade Spain to restore Ferdinand VII as an absolute monarch. With that agreement from the Holy Alliance, on 28 January 1823, Louis XVIII announced that "a hundred thousand Frenchmen are ready to march, invoking the name of Saint Louis, to safeguard the throne of Spain for a grandson of Henry IV of France". Ferdinand VII (October 14, 1784 - September 29, 1833) was King of Spain from 1813 to 1833.

The eldest son of Charles IV, king of Spain, and of his wife Maria Louisa of Parma, he was born in the vast palace of El Escorial near Madrid. When his father's abdication was extorted by a popular riot at Aranjuez in March 1808, he ascended the throne but turned again to Napoleon, in the hope that the emperor would support him. He was in his turn forced to make an abdication and imprisoned in France for almost seven years at the Chateau of Valençay in the town of Valençay.

The Spanish people, blaming the liberal, enlightened policies of the Francophiles. For incurring the Napoleonic occupation and the Peninsular War, at first welcomed. Ferdinand soon found that while Spain was fighting for independence in his name and while in his name juntas had governed in Spanish America, a new world had been born of foreign invasion and domestic revolution. Spain was no longer an absolute monarchy under the liberal Constitution of 1812. Ferdinand, in being restored to the throne, guaranteed the liberals that he would govern on the basis of the existing constitution, but, encouraged by conservatives backed by the Church hierarchy, he rejected the constitution within weeks (May 4) and arrested the liberal leaders (May 10), justifying his actions as rejecting a constitution made by the Cortes in his absence and without his consent. Thus he had come back to assert the Bourbon doctrine that the sovereign authority resided in his person only.

After he succeeded to the throne in 1788 his one serious occupation was hunting. Affairs were left to be directed by his wife and her lover Manuel de Godoy.

Although Godoy essentially took over his wife and his office, the king was favourable towards him for all his life. When terrified by the French Revolution he turned to the Inquisition to help him against the party which would have carried the reforming policy of Charles III much further.

But he never took more than a passive part in the direction of his own government. He simply obeyed the impulse given him by the queen and Godoy.

In 1803, after smallpox had affected his daughter María Luísa, the king commissioned his doctor Francisco Javier de Balmis to bring the vaccine to the Spanish colonies on state expenses. He had a profound belief in his divine right and the sanctity of his person.

He thought it very important to seem a very powerful monarch, although his kingdom was treated as a mere dependency by France and his throne was dominated by the queen and her lover. Spain allied with France and supported the Continental Blockade, but withdrew after the Battle of Trafalgar. But even the alliance with France, as it was, made Godoy's rule unpopular and fueled the partido fernandista, the supporters of Ferdinand, who favored a close relationship with Great Britain. The item "1823, Spain, Ferdinand VII.

Silver Restoration of Absolutism Medal. PCGS UNC+" is in sale since Wednesday, March 15, 2017.

This item is in the category "Coins & Paper Money\Coins\ World\Europe\Spain". The seller is "coinworldtv" and is located in Europe. This item can be shipped worldwide.

  • Certification Number: 82683968
  • Certification: PCGS


1823, Spain, Ferdinand VII. Silver Restoration of Absolutism Medal. PCGS UNC+   

1823, Spain, Ferdinand VII. Silver Restoration of Absolutism Medal. PCGS UNC+